Commercial

Most schools and day care facilities receive water from community water. Schools that draw water from public utilities showed higher levels of contamination, especially older buildings where lead and other contaminants can concentrate at higher levels than in most homes. Most lead gets into drinking water after the water leaves the local well or treatment plant and comes into contact with plumbing materials containing lead systems. Exposure to lead is a significant health concern, but the contaminants are especially dangerous to children, who drink more water per pound than adults and are more vulnerable to the effects of many hazardous substances.

Fountains should also be included in the regular flushing of the facility’s plumbing system. Drinking water fountains should be cleaned on a daily basis to reduce possible bacterial contamination. Another big concern is a watering hose. Most of the hoses that are tested were made from polyvinyl chloride, a toxic plastic that often contains endocrine-disrupting stabilizers known as organ tins, which can interfere with hormonal and reproductive development. If there's anything we can learn from this, it's that all water is not safe drinking water and to take more precaution when choosing a water source.

It has been proven that schools have the highest amount of contamination in their water supply. Most schools and day care facilities receive water from community water. Schools that draw water from public utilities showed higher levels of contamination, especially older buildings where lead and other contaminants can concentrate at higher levels than in most homes. Most lead gets into drinking water after the water leaves the local well or treatment plant and comes into contact with plumbing materials containing lead systems. Exposure to lead is a significant health concern, but the contaminants are especially dangerous to children, who drink more water per pound than adults and are more vulnerable to the effects of many hazardous substances.