How does a reverse osmosis water filter system work?

Quality purification requires time, so the output from using reverse osmosis water filter systems is relatively small. The water in reverse osmosis water filter systems must pass through several stages of purification to achieve the most effective and efficient level of purification. Pre-treatment in reverse osmosis water filter systems is critical. The reverse osmosis membrane is the most expensive and sensitive part of the reverse osmosis water filter system and is protected and preserved by sediment and carbon filters.

The slowest stage in reverse osmosis water filter systems is the passage through the reverse osmosis membrane. The rate of passage of molecules through the reverse osmosis membrane is dependent on several factors, the most important of which is the fluid pressure. Then, there is the concentration of impurities in the water, as well as the temperature, and the degree of permeability of the reverse osmosis membrane itself. Household reverse osmosis water filter systems are equipped with reverse osmosis membranes that produce from 25-150 gallons per day.

After the water passes through the reverse osmosis membrane, it is collected in a holding tank which typically has a capacity of 3.2 gallons. As clean water is used, the highly-efficient reverse osmosis water filter system will automatically add filtered water into the tank. The inside of the tank is divided into two chambers. The lower chamber is pressurized by air allowing a silicone membrane to inflate, as water is drained from the tank preserving the flow rate until the tank is drained. There is a valve which allows the pressure in the tank to be adjusted, if necessary.

The final stage of purification in reverse osmosis water filter systems is a post-filter, which adds an additional guarantee to the purity of drinking water coming from the tank through a separate faucet installed in the sink or countertop. All reverse osmosis water filter systems can be customized with a variety of post-filters that can affect the pH, taste, or structure of the purified water.